Accepting Your Voice

Accepting Your Voice

by Alida Annicchiarico
Don’t try to make it sound “pretty” or what you think sounds “pretty”. Use your natural voice, you know, the one that you speak in all day. If you train it effectively, the results can be very rewarding. Let your vocal coach point you in the right direction and guide you towards healthy vocal development. Worrying about what you sound like will take the enjoyment out of singing.

“I want to sound like Chris Cornell or Adele immediately.” Trying to sound like anyone else is a long lost goal since no two voices are alike in timbre. Don’t get me wrong, there are some great impersonators out there who have mastered the art of mimicking. If you’d like to impersonate, then that’s a different path. But if you would like to develop your true voice, sing your own tunes, or even cover some oldies, Speech Level Singing vocal technique can help you maintain good healthy vocals and your style will develop through the technique. You will get to know your voice better and your unique tone shines through as a result, which becomes your “style.”

Trying to change your voice when you go to sing can sometimes do more harm than good. For example, we may try to force the sound through our nose, thinking that’s our “style”. When in fact, the singer’s true voice isn’t nasal naturally. Singing nasal is usually singing with a higher larynx which over time can cause vocal fatigue and may even lead to vocal health problems.
Your voice can and will get better with time and the practice of SLS technique. First off, it requires a lot of patience and acceptance. Secondly, rather than beating yourself up about not sounding “good enough”, go with what singing feels like. If it feels strained or requires a lot of effort, then chances are you’re headed in the wrong direction. You may need some more lessons or practice of the vocal exercises. Lastly, instead of expecting that your voice should automatically be at the same level as someone else’s, a more constructive approach is to focus on your own personal vocal development. Don’t compare your vocal progress to anyone else’s. Accept your voice and work with what you’ve got!